Skip to main content

News

Full listing

Cornell physicist’s discovery could lead to the engineering of high-temp superconducting properties into materials useful for quantum computing, medical imaging.
A $10 million gift from an alumni donor will grow the roster of faculty, students and equipment needed to study the mysterious behavior of matter at atomic and subatomic scales, strengthening the university’s position as a leader in quantum science and technology.
Read the recent Grad School "Student Spotlight" on Yongjian Tang, recipient of the Hsien and Daisy Yen Wu Scholarship and graduate researcher in the Ralph Group.
Four Cornell faculty members from three different colleges received the 2022 Kappa Delta Ann Doner Vaughn Award for their collaborative research on the mechanics and composition of articular cartilage and its relevance to disease.
Seven exceptional early-career scholars will be awarded three-year fellowships to pursue independent research in the arts and humanities, social sciences and natural sciences.
Seven Cornell faculty members have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific society. This year's fellows, 564 in all, will be honored at a virtual event Feb. 19.
Seven Cornell faculty members have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific society. This year's fellows, 564 in all, will be honored at a virtual event Feb. 19.
Michelle Wang's research group and their use of optical tweezers to manipulate DNA has garnered media attention again. Postdoctoral associate Fan Ye’s paper, “Resonator Nanophotonic Standing-Wave Array Trap for Single-Molecule Manipulation and Measurement”, describes the enhancement and optimization of optical tweezers into a nanoscale device, the nanophotonic standing-wave array trap (nSWAT)
A team led by Natasha Holmes, the Ann S. Bowers Assistant Professor, set out to interview and survey physics undergraduates to see what role their preferences play in the well-documented gender disparities in physics lab courses. 
With a little twist and the turn of a voltage knob, Cornell researchers have shown that a single material system can toggle between two of the wildest states in condensed matter physics.