Skip to main content
Cornell University
LASSP -  Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics

Cornell Laboratory for Atomic and Solid State Physics

Erich Mueller proposes a new way to produce a specific quantum state, whose excitations act as anyons

In the three-dimensional world, all fundamental particles must fall into one of two categories – those that behave like the photons that make up light, and those that behave like the electrons and protons that make up matter.

In a hypothetical two-dimensional world, however, there would be an infinite number of additional options, referred to as anyons. These theorized particles are characterized by how moving them around one another manipulates quantum information. With access to the right system of anyons, ultrafast error-free quantum computing would be possible.

Recent work by Erich Mueller, professor in the Department of Physics, and doctoral student Shovan Dutta, takes an important step toward this goal by proposing a new way to produce a specific quantum state, whose excitations act as anyons.

 

Their paper, “Coherent Generation of Photonic Fractional Quantum Hall States in a Cavity and the Search for Anyonic Quasiparticles,” was published March 15 in Physical Review A, a publication of the American Physical Society.

Read More