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Paul McEuen: 2017 Clarivate Analytics Citation Laureate

Since 202, Clarivate Analytics Web of Science has researchers whose work is worthy of Noble recognition based on their high citation tallies. This year, Paul McEuen with Phaedon Avouris and Cornelis Dekker have been chosen for their contribution to carbon-based electronics.

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Eun-Ah Kim Talks Electron Behavior

In CornellResearch's article by Caitlin Hayes, Eun-Ah Kim shares how she perceives and studies the secretive interactive behaviour of electrons.

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The Social Life of Electrons

Tsevi Beatus and Itai Cohen study how a spider uses locomotion to mimic an ant

Humans aren’t the only actors on the planet. To avoid being eaten, the ant-mimicking jumping spider pretends to be an ant, according to Cornell research published July 12 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Ants are aggressive at defending themselves: They are well-armed with bites and stings and formic acid. Ant-mimicking jumping spiders (Myrmarachne formicaria), in contrast, can’t do much more than run on their eight legs when attacked. Not surprisingly, insect predators tend to prefer spiders over ants, so appearing to be an ant confers significant protection.

Protective mimicry is a remarkable example of adaptive evolution: Moths can be colored like butterflies, and grasshoppers may look like tiger beetles. While most mimicry studies focus on traits like color and shape, the researchers used multiple high-speed cameras and behavioral experiments to pinpoint how the spider’s movements mimic ants.

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Jeevak Parpia's research group look for new phase transitions

When Cornell physicists Robert Richardson, David Lee and Douglas Osheroff received the 1996 Nobel Prize for their discovery of the superfluid state of liquid helium, it was only the beginning. Now a new team of Cornell researchers, building on that work, have found new complexities in the phenomenon, with implications for the study of superconductivity and theoretical models of the origin of the universe.

“We wanted to see new phase transitions,” said Jeevak Parpia, professor of physics. As it turned out, he saw a more “efficient” transition compared to any observed before in helium.

The results are published July 3 in the journal Nature Communications. Parpia and his research group collaborated with a group led by John Saunders, professor of physics, at Royal Holloway, University of London.

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Séamus Davis recognized in The Irish Times

Séamus Davis was recognized in The Irish Times as an Irish quantum physicist bringing superconductor resech a sep closer to the 'hoy grail' of quantum physics.

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Séamus Davis, Eun-Ah Kim, Kyle Shen, Darrell Schlom, and Craig Fennie win $1M Keck Foundation Grant

A cross-campus collaboration led by Cornell engineering professor Darrell Schlom has been awarded $1 million from the W.M. Keck Foundation to transition its groundbreaking research from bold theory, based on extensive calculation, to creating a specific topological superconducting material that could pave the way to quantum computing.

“We have state-of-the-art capabilities to make artificial materials and interrogate their properties that are relevant to quantum computing, and this is a particularly exciting system for materials discovery because of its complexity and potential payoff,” said Schlom, the Herbert Fisk Johnson Professor of Industrial Chemistry in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

Other team members are J.C. Seamus Davis, the James Gilbert White Distinguished Professor in the Physical Sciences; Craig Fennie, associate professor of applied and engineering physics; Eun-Ah Kim, associate professor of physics; and Kyle Shen, associate professor of physics.

The team’s project is titled “A Materials-by-Design Approach to an Odd-Parity Topological Superconductor,” and its goal is to discover a material that will lay the foundation for a stable and scalable quantum computing technology.

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